Drug Rehabilitation Information and Statistics

Several government agencies, including the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), provide the public with information and statistics related to substance abuse and Drug rehab litation. During 2009, the organization reported that 23.5 million people in the United States over the age of 11 needed help addressing addiction issues for drugs or alcohol. This figure represents just over nine percent of the total national population. Of this number, just over 11 percent who needed help attended a specialized treatment facility. About 40 percent of admissions were for alcohol abuse, followed by 20 percent for heroin or opiate abuse and 17 percent for marijuana abuse (http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/infofacts/treatment-
statistics).

Drug rehabilitation, more commonly known as drug rehab, means a person addresses medical, physical, emotional and/or spiritual issues which led to addiction to alcohol, prescription or illegal drugs. Many famous people, including celebrities such as Daniel Baldwin, Gary Busey, Rodney King, Mackenzie Phillips and Dennis Rodman, have addressed their addiction issues through drug rehab. Drug rehab attempts to teach clients how to relate in the community without the use of mood-altering substances. This includes finding new friends, changing all habits related to drug use and complete elimination and abstinence from all drugs, including alcohol.

Several types of drug rehab help patients learn how to become and remain clean and sober. Residential treatment, also called in-
patient treatment, addresses those addicts with the most serious substance abuse problems and provides a place for the patient to live during their recovery period. While residential drug rehab programs offer the patient medication, counseling and a supporting atmosphere, the client must bring the desire to remain drug-free. Out-patient programs meet from one to several times a week and help patients remain in the community working as they achieve sobriety. Support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, provide the recovering individual with a community of individuals who are working toward sobriety. Recovering individuals often use these groups in conjunction with either residential or out-patient programs. Halfway houses act as a transitional program and allow people to begin to integrate back into the community through work or school as they learn to maintain a clean and sober life.

An addict must process through several phases of treatment in order to successfully overcome their substance abuse issues. Medical detoxification, while an important first step, will not keep an addict clean permanently. Behavioral therapy, including education, continues the process of treatment. These two steps are followed by relapse prevention so the recovering person can continue in a productive lifestyle. Studies have shown that for treatment to be the most effective, it must include medical, social and mental health, after care and community support systems. Cognitive-behavioral therapy increases the patient’s awareness of stressful people or circumstances that would increase the likelihood of drug use. Family therapy addresses the needs of the entire family as they have been affected by the client’s drug use. Every program has their own rules, so interested individuals need to check with specific facilities to find out details, including costs, length of stay and type of treatment.